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Queen Street pedestrian and access proposals

Concept design plans of what the proposed scheme could look like:

These are large plans and may be difficult to read. Plans are on display in the shop unit opposite Wilkos, Market Walk, Newton Abbot.

Tell us what you think

The engagement period for the Future High Street Fund has now ended and thank you for any comments you have made. Responses are now being considered and we will continue to work together if our bid is successful.

Planned improvements

Improving the environment and sense of identity in a town centre results in greater commercial resilience and stronger community wellbeing. By improving pedestrian access and cycling links we will secure:

  • Greater level of footfall (estimated 10-15%), and cycling trips (estimated 40-45%)
  • More enjoyable journeys, increasing frequency and supporting longer stays
  • More space for shoppers, including those with mobility issues
  • Less motor-traffic on 1-way stretch of Queen Street, resulting in lower greenhouse gases & noise pollution
  • Increased greening is good for wellbeing and for encouraging longer stays as trees provide shade, add visual appeal, uptake pollutants and storm-water, reduce CO2, and provide habitat
  • Reduced risk of road traffic collisions
  • Lower sick rates due to the above improved wellbeing.

Pedestrian & cycling improvements are some of the public, community benefits that also support local businesses and which is measured for this funding bid. Called the Benefit Cost Ratio, its strength is an important factor supporting the overall Future High Street Fund bid package

High streets and town centres can function as a community hub and visitor destination by supporting pedestrian friendly streets which provide wellbeing and community cohesion. Footfall is a good indicator of business performance as it is influenced by the quality of the shopping environment.

Some case studies of town centre enhancements and related outcomes are listed below:

  • Piccadilly, Stoke-on-Trent: £10 million investment to make the area more pedestrian-friendly increased footfall by 30%. New businesses, cafes and restaurants opened leading to more investment
  • Coventry City Centre: new pedestrian areas, civic square, clearer signs and better placement of street furniture were credited with a 25% rise in footfall on Saturdays
  • Altrincham, Greater Manchester: £15 million investment in new market, better streets, pavements and crossing points are credited with increasing footfall by 25%
  • A temporary ‘parklet’ in Shoreditch, East London: turning a two car parking space into seating and cycle parking increased adjacent shops takings by 20%.

The proposed pedestrian and access improvements for the FHSF bid are summarised below:

  • Modifying cycling and pedestrian crossing outside the rail station, paving the way for a cycling link between the rail station & NCN Route 2
  • Narrowing junctions of Courtenay Park Road and Quay Road to deliver pedestrian improvement
  • Redistributing the loading bay capacity from outside the ex-Queens Hotel to unlock space for greening and potentially seating, creating a good-quality gateway into town
  • Uplifting the loading capacity to support businesses, with extensions of two existing bays and a new bay close to Albany Street
  • Increasing spaces for disabled parking on Queen Street, Courtenay Street and Victoria Place to ensure priority parking for direct access easier for shoppers who are less physically able
  • Wider pavements unlock space for outdoor seating outside cafes & eateries as well as enhancing visual appeal and sense of place in this central community hub
  • Encouraging reduced car dominance via narrower carriageway between The Avenue and Courtenay Street, enabling wider pavements and supporting good-quality access for all users.
  • Rationalising street-side parking locations and loading bays along Queen Street, and relocating to significantly increased capacity within a two to three minute walk at Cricketfield.
  • Retaining a third of street-side parking (including increasing disabled access parking) to enable those wishing to Pop & Shop.

 

Summary comparison table with more specific details for Queen Street 
Parking arrangements Current status on-the-ground Proposed Change
Standard parking spaces on Queen Street  63 spaces Approx. 20 spaces (will be over 100 additional spaces via Cricketfield decking, 2-3min walk)
Disabled access spaces on Queen Street 2 spaces 5 spaces
Loading bay length on Queen Street 121m length  127m length 
Taxi rank length on Queen Street 36.5m length Approx. 10.0m length
Bus drop-off bay on Queen Street 1 stop, circa 30m length 1 stop, approx. 30-35m length
Public green elements on Queen Street Hanging baskets, Planters at The Avenue junction,
Green patch (War Memorial)
Hanging baskets
Planters at The Avenue junction
Green patch (War Memorial)
Unlocked potential for planting at a series of additional locations, including trees
Public seating on Queen Street None Unlocked potential for public seating at two or three locations, and for café & eatery seating at numerous locations along Queen Street

 

Summary for each stretch along Queen Street
Parking arrangements Current status on-the-ground Proposed Change
Rail station – Quay Road 8 standard parking spaces
2 loading bays 19m + 13m(west)
North pavement width 2.25m
South pavement width 2.5m-3.0m
2 standard parking spaces
1 loading bay 18m(west)
North pavement width 2.25m
South pavement width 2.5m but outside ex-Queens Hotel 5.0m to unlock space for greening (tree planting?)
Greening @ Courtney Park Rd junction
Quay Road – The Avenue  7 standard parking spaces
2 loading bays 14m(east) + 17m
North pavement width 2.5m
South pavement width 2.25m
5 standard parking spaces
2 loading bays 19m(east) + 17m
North pavement width 2.5m
South pavement width 2.25m
1 disabled access parking space
Space for greening Quay Rd. junction
The Avenue – Lemon Road​ 12 standard parking spaces
1 loading bay 14m
1 taxi bay 21m
North pavement width 2.75m
South pavement width 2.5m
6 standard parking spaces
1 loading bay 17m
1 disabled access parking spaces
North pavement width 3.5m
South pavement width 3.75m
Greening/seating potential by church
May be potential for café seating
Lemon Road – Prospect Terrace 1 loading bay 14m
North pavement width 2.5m-2.75m
South pavement width 2.25-2.5m
North pavement width 3.5m-3.75m
South pavement width 3.75m-4.0m
Greening potential Devon Sq. junction
May be potential for café seating
Additional cycle racks
Prospect Terrace – Fairfield Terrace
(to the eastern edge of Fairfield Terrace junction)
6 standard parking spaces
1 loading bay 16.5m
1 taxi bay 15.5m
North pavement width 1.5m
South pavement width 2.25m
1 loading bay 21.5m
2 length taxi bay 10.0m
1 disabled parking space
North pavement width 2.5m
South pavement width 3.25m
Greening/seating potential by Kingdom Hall (south pavement)
Space for seating/greening opposite Fairfield Terrace junction (Riccas)
Fairfield Terrace – Albany Street 5 standard parking spaces
North pavement width 1.75m
South pavement width 2.25m
2 standard parking spaces
North pavement width 2.5m /2.75m
South pavement width 3.0m /3.25m
1 loading bay 16.5m
Albany Street – King Street (to western edge of King Street junction) 5 standard parking spaces
North pavement width 1.75m
South pavement width 2.25m
North pavement width circa 3.75m
South pavement width circa 3.25m
Outdoor seating space for cafes.
King Street – Courtenay Street 20 standard parking spaces
2 disabled parking spaces
1 loading bay 13.5m
1 bus bay 30m
North pavement width 1.75m-2.0m
South pavement width 1.75m-2.0m
5 standard parking spaces
2 disabled access parking spaces
1 loading bay 17.5m
1 bus bay 30m-35m
North pavement width 2.75m-3.0m
South pavement width 2.75m-3.0m
(a little narrower beside disabled bays to maintain sufficient road width)

 

Other changes, on Victoria Place and Courtney Street
Parking arrangements Current status on-the-ground Proposed Change
Standard parking spaces Victoria Place 7 spaces 3 spaces
Disabled spaces on Victoria Place 7 spaces 8 spaces
Loading bay length on Victoria Place 12m length 26m length
(12m bay eastern end of this road
& 14m bay mid-way along this road)
Standard parking spaces on Courtenay Street (N. end) 3 spaces 2 spaces
(1 of the existing three spaces to become a disabled space)
Disabled spaces on Courtenay Street 0 spaces 1 space

When this content has been updated

Last updated 8 July 2020