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Are you suffering from noise?

The authority has a duty to investigate complaints of noise nuisance. If your complaint can be substantiated then action will be taken to reduce the noise.

Confidentiality

All complainants personal details will be treated confidentially, however should the case go to court then your names would have to be released. You would have an opportunity to discuss this with the case officer before the details were released.

If you wish to report an emergency out of office hours, please contact Home Safeguard who are responsible for managing our out of hours service and who will deal with your service request. Home Safeguard can be contacted on 01395 516854

Dog Barking

Dog owners, particularly if they are at work all day, may not realise that while they are away the dog is causing a problem. Many dog owners are concerned when they realise their dog is in distress while they are away.

If you experience a problem with a barking dog, approaching the owner is a useful first step. If this is not successful you can make a complaint which we will investigate. You will need to know the address of the property where the dog is barking.

Click here to Do It Online

Alarms

If you have a house or car alarm, leave a key with a neighbour or friend in case it is accidentally set off. 

Key Holders

Register key holders with Teignbridge to ensure that problems can be dealt with if you are out or away. Please complete the form that is available to download pdf icon Intruder Alarm Registration Form [16kb]and return it to envc@teignbridge.gov.uk or complete the Intruder Alarm Report Form..

Construction Sites

The Control of Pollution Act 1974 allows Local Authorities to impose noise limits on construction sites.  A British Standard also gives guidance on various types of construction equipment and the noise levels that they produce.

If you are being affected by noise from a construction site or are a developer or contractor and would like to discuss noise control measures please contact the Environmental Control Team on the link displayed below.

Domestic Appliances

We use more and more appliances to help us with the housework - and they can be very noisy. Where you put them and when you use them can make all the difference.

Make sure washing machines, fridge's and dishwashers are away from party walls and on a carpet or mat to reduce vibration - especially if you live in a flat.

Use noisy appliances at sensible times - during normal waking hours. Hovering in the early hours could wake up half the street!

Consider those at home - if hovering/using a food processor, shutting doors will avoid the necessity to turn up the TV or music.

If buying a new appliance consider the low noise option. Some products - Hoovers, lawn mowers, washing machines etc have a noise rating - if they haven't ask why.

An Environmental Noise Assessment is usually required when a proposal is believed to have a potential to generate noise above the existing background levels which may cause complaints to be received from local residents. It may also be required to identify solutions to an existing noise complaint following the service of an Abatement Notice.

Maintenance and DIY

We all do noisy work form time to time to maintain and improve our home.

Do noisy jobs and operate noisy equipment when it will cause least disturbance to your neighbours - avoid working when they are trying to sleep or enjoy a quiet night in.

If you are doing something really noisy e.g. floor sanding, drilling in party walls - let them know beforehand and they are far less likely to complain.

Where possible carry out noisy outdoor jobs in the garage or shed.

If you carry out car or other repairs outside, do this in the place and time where it will cause least disturbance.

If you are employing builders, agree working times with them that will not annoy the neighbours - or you. If you play your own music, keep the volume down, windows, shut, and agree time to practice when you will cause least disturbance.

Music and Entertainment

To avoid annoyance - or worse, follow these simple rules:

Keep the volume down - whether it's TV, car stereo or conversation - especially at night/early morning.

Place speakers away from partition walls, floors or ceilings. Standing these on an insulating material can reduce transmission of sound.

If you are having a party, consider inviting the neighbours. Keep windows and doors closed, and if someone complains, turn it down.

With personal entertainment - for example toys, computer games - be considerate - keep the volume down. Avoid using them in the same room where someone is watching TV or listening to the radio. Turning the volume up may disturb your neighbours.

If you play your own music, keep the volume down, windows, shut, and agree time to practice when you will cause least disturbance.

You can report loud music from a house by completing the online form:
Click here to Do It Online  

Your Garden

Think before installing features in your garden that make a noise - the splashing fountain or tinkling chimes might soothe you on a sunny afternoon, but it could drive your neighbours mad at night.

When entertaining in the garden remember that sound travels. Avoid amplified music outdoors.

Your Home

Avoid slamming doors and thundering up and down the stairs - especially if you live in a flat or terraced house.

When considering options for flooring, be considerate. Many leases prohibit stripped floors/hard surfaces - for good reason!

If you have stripped/laminate flooring, take off heavy shoes/boots. Socks or slippers will reduce noise.

If installing laminated flooring, make sure you use sound insulating underlay.

Sounds travel through walls, so be aware of what's next door. If you can, avoid having noisy spaces (kitchen, living room) adjacent to quiet spaces (bedroom, study).

Further advice can be found at Improving Sound Insulation in Homes

Environmental Noise Assessment

What is an Environmental Noise Assessment?

An assessment of environmental noise involves three main stages. The first stage is the measurement of the existing background noise levels at the site. The second stage is the measurement of existing sources or the prediction of noise from future sources. The third stage involves evaluating the actual or predicted value against the most relevant criteria and assessing whether complaints from local residents are likely to occur.

Why do I need an Environmental Noise Assessment?

An Environmental Noise Assessment is usually required when a proposal is believed to have a potential to generate noise above the existing background levels which may cause complaints to be received from local residents. It may also be required to identify solutions to an existing noise complaint following the service of an Abatement Notice.

Who can I ask to carry out an Assessment?

We strongly recommend that when you commission an assessment, the consultant contacts a member of the Environmental Control Team on 01626 215064. They can ensure that the assessment will be accepted and agree on the relevant criteria on which the assessment will be made. A list of Noise consultants is available on the Institute of acoustics website. www.ioa.org.uk